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Is an aspirin a day good for you, and how much should you take? Ten years after the FDA issued recommendations about the use of aspirin for people who have had heart attacks or are at risk for them, it may be a good time to talk to your doctor about the aspirin you're taking.

University of Kentucky heart disease researchers say that nearly a quarter of a million Americans each year may be hospitalized with bleeding complications caused by needlessly taking a daily dose of an adult-sized aspirin rather than a baby aspirin to prevent a heart attack or stroke.

Is an aspirin a day good for you, and how much should you take? Ten years after the FDA issued recommendations about the use of aspirin for people who have had heart attacks or are at risk for them, it may be a good time to talk to your doctor about the aspirin you're taking.
University of Kentucky heart disease researchers say that nearly a quarter of a million Americans each year may be hospitalized with bleeding complications caused by needlessly taking a daily dose of an adult-sized aspirin rather than a baby aspirin to prevent a heart attack or stroke.
Last year, a study by a group of UK HealthCare Gill Heart Institute cardiologists at the University of Kentucky found that the commonly prescribed 325 mg adult tablet may be more than many people need each day. The study, which was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, found that doses higher than a baby aspirin, 75 to 81 mg, are no better at preventing cardiovascular events long-term and are associated with increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding.
Lumbrokinase is a new product which shows promise in dissolving clots without the risk of hemorrhage. Clinical studies have shown that stroke patients on Lumbrokinase within one month following a stroke showed almost complete recovery.
Lumbrokinase also referred to as: earthworm powder. The earthworm whose scientific name is Lumbricus rubellus has been used for centuries in the Far East as a traditional medicine. The earthworm's ability to break down fibrin was reported by Fredericq and Krukenberg in the 1920's. Since then, some Japanese scholar like Mihara Hisashi succeeded in extracting fibrin dissolving enzyme from Lumbricus rubellus, and also found that this enzyme consists of six proteolytic enzymes, which are collectively named Lumbrokinase. Lumbrokinase also overcame the adverse effects of bleeding by having a uniquely high affinity for fibrin.
As Lumbrokinase is easily taken, has few side effects and no hemorrhage risk. Boluoke has no gastrointestinal reaction; it can be used as a substitute for patients who are unable to tolerate aspirin.
Boluoke is also used in the prevention and treatment of some chronic diseases, for example: diabetes mellitus, pulmonary heart disease, atrial fibrillation, malignant tumor, systemic lupus erythematosus, anemia, liver disease and preeclampsia. It is a good adjunctive treatment for patients who are on or have had EDTA chelation therapy or hyperbaric oxygen therapy.
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