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Nowadays when we hear the phrase “junk mail”, we almost immediately think of our e-mail inbox, but one trip to a home mailbox and we’re easily reminded of how much junk mail we get on a regular basis. From credit card offers to catalogs and advertisements, our mailbox is filled with an average of 40+ pounds of junk mail per year!

If you’re concerned about our environment and would like to take steps to preserve our natural resources, there are a variety of ways to to prevent unwanted mail.

1) Sign up with https://www.catalogchoice.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to help stop junk mail. Their free service allows you to cancel specific catalogs, credit card offers, coupons and other types of paper mail you no longer wish to receive.

2) Started by three brothers in Michigan in 2006, http://www.41pounds.org will contact up to 30 direct mail companies on your behalf just by filling out a quick contact info form.

3) With an app called PaperKarma, simply snap a photo of the unwanted mail you want to stop and they automatically contact the mailer to remove you from their list.

4) Opting either in or out of credit or insurance offers is a cinch with https://www.optoutprescreen.com. By offering two different options including a five year opt out and a permanent opt out, the choice is yours.

5) Customize or opt out of directory deliveries with https://www.yellowpagesoptout.com. A simple zip code search and an easy online address form will allow you to put a stop to the various yellow pages you receive at your location.

6) Remember to fill out a change of address and update your information with the previously mentioned services every time you move!

Even though the US Postal Service does not have one easy method for reducing junk mail, there are many simple ways to stop the amount you receive on a regular basis. With an estimated $320 million in local tax money used to dispose of junk mail, and more than 100 million trees used to create pulpwood for paper products, reducing your personal amount of unwanted mail is most certainly an earth friendly thing to do.